disclaim


disclaim
disclaim, disavow, repudiate, disown, disallow mean to refuse to admit, accept, or approve.
Disclaim implies re-fusal to admit or accept a claim, but it may apply specifically to a legal claim one has upon property or to a title
{

the son disclaimed all right to his father's small estate

}
or to the claim or imputation of something evil made by another to one's chagrin or dismay
{

this court disclaims all pretensions to such a power— John Marshall

}
{

I entirely disclaim the hatred and hostility to Turks . . . which you ascribe to meGladstone

}
or, even more frequently, to the implied or expressed praise of oneself by another
{

Mark was embarrassed by the Rector's talking like this; but if he disclaimed the virtues attributed to him he should . . . give an impression of false modesty— Mackenzie

}
Disavow often comes close to disclaim in meaning, but it much less often implies reference to a legal claim and fastens the attention upon a vigorous denial either of personal responsibility for something or personal acceptance or approval of something
{

Melfort never disavowed these papers— Macaulay

}
{

the boys disavowed any intention to set the stable on fire

}
{

this Court always had disavowed the right to intrude its judgment upon questions of policy or morals— Justice Holmes

}
Repudiate originally applied to a casting away of one's wife (see also repudiate under DECLINE); it may also imply a casting off or a denial of responsibility for something that has been previously acknowledged, recognized, or accepted
{

they repudiated their heresies

}
{

the state has repudiated its debts

}
{

a law which everyone recognizes in fact, though everyone re-pudiates it in theory— Dickinson

}
{

the liberal mind . . . had repudiated the doctrine of original sin— Straight

}
Disown usually stresses a repudiation or renunciation and often applies to something that has stood in close relationship to the person disowning; it may specifically imply disinheritance or abjuration
{

disowned his son

}
{

disowned his allegiance to the country of his birth

}
{

the prince . . . was . . . required to disown ... the obligations contracted in his name— Froude

}
Disallow implies the withholding of sanction or approval and sometimes suggests complete rejection or condemnation
{

disallowed the jockey's claim of a foul

}
{

disallow a bill for the entertainment of the officers

}
{

it was known that the most eminent of those who professed his own principles, publicly disallowed his proceedings— Swift

}
{

your claim upon her hand is already disallowedG. P. R. James

}
Analogous words: *deny, gainsay, traverse, contradict: reject, refuse, spurn (see DECLINE): deprecate (see DISAPPROVE): belittle, minimize, disparage (see DECRY)
Antonyms: claim

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • disclaim — dis·claim /dis klām/ vi: to make a disclaimer vt 1: to reject or relinquish a claim to (as an interest in an estate) 2 a: to deny or reject the right, validity, or authority of b: to negate or limit the rights under (a warranty) dis·claim·ant /… …   Law dictionary

  • disclaim — UK US /dɪsˈkleɪm/ verb [T] ► LAW to state that you are not legally responsible for something: disclaim responsibility/liability for sth »A restaurant may disclaim responsibility for loss or damage to a customer s personal property. ► to refuse to …   Financial and business terms

  • Disclaim — Dis*claim , v. t. To disavow or renounce all part, claim, or share. Blackstone. [1913 Webster] {Disclaim in}, {Disclaim from}, to disown; to disavow. [Obs.] Nature disclaims in thee. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Disclaim in — Disclaim Dis*claim , v. t. To disavow or renounce all part, claim, or share. Blackstone. [1913 Webster] {Disclaim in}, {Disclaim from}, to disown; to disavow. [Obs.] Nature disclaims in thee. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • disclaim — (v.) c.1400, from Anglo Fr. disclaimer, O.Fr. desclamer disclaim, disavow, from des (see DIS (Cf. dis )) + clamer to call, cry out, claim (see CLAIM (Cf. claim) (v.)). Related: Disclaimed; disclaiming …   Etymology dictionary

  • Disclaim — Dis*claim , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Disclaimed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Disclaiming}.] 1. To renounce all claim to deny; ownership of, or responsibility for; to disown; to disavow; to reject. [1913 Webster] He calls the gods to witness their offense;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • disclaim — The act of denying, refusing, renouncing or repudiating an interest that one might have in some item. (Dictionary of Canadian Bankruptcy Terms) United Glossary of Bankruptcy Terms 2012 …   Glossary of Bankruptcy

  • disclaim — [v] deny abandon, abjure, abnegate, belittle, contradict, contravene, criticize, decline, deprecate, disacknowledge, disaffirm, disallow, disavow, discard, disown, disparage, divorce oneself from, forswear, gainsay, minimize, negate, recant,… …   New thesaurus

  • disclaim — ► VERB 1) refuse to acknowledge. 2) Law renounce a legal claim to (a property or title) …   English terms dictionary

  • disclaim — [dis klām′] vt. [ME disclaimen < Anglo Fr desclamer: see DIS & CLAIM] 1. to give up or renounce any claim to or connection with 2. to refuse to acknowledge or admit; deny; repudiate vi. to make a disclaimer …   English World dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.